Contributing Editors



Self Storage Company Supports the Pajama Program

by Holly Robinson July 18, 2011 6:15 PM
Who does not like to spend a nice, relaxing day curled up with a good book and wearing nothing but your pajamas? It doesn’t matter how old you are. There is just something that is comforting about pajamas. Books give us a chance to exercise our brains while we escape into another world inside its pages. [More]

Self Storage Company Goes Back to School

by Holly Robinson May 12, 2011 2:39 PM
Anyone who says they have not watched their kids or someone else’s blissfully playing some simple game and not thought,” The good ole days!” is lying. While life appeared to be as complex as can be when we were around elementary school age, the simplicity of it now from the outside looking in is enough to make you a little nostalgic. [More]

Self Storage, a Family Friendly Business

by Tony Gonzalez March 1, 2011 7:54 AM
There is one thing that just about every business wants to be considered and that is to be family friendly. With that kind of reputation a business is often seen as one that you can trust your business, or in the case of the self storage industry, your belongings to. That of course translates into more business and a healthier bottom line. [More]

Don’t Burn Your Stored Books Yet -- Scholars Say Bound Books More Accurate Than Google

by John Stevens September 13, 2010 3:51 PM
Have rumors of the demise of the hardbound book been greatly exaggerated? Some scholars, especially linguists, say so. Google Books is being criticized by a growing number of sources for providing inaccurate metadata -- the informational tags that tell searchers what they can hope to find in a given source. If you are making decisions about what to do with books saved in a self storage unit based on the possibility of finding texts online using Google Books, you may want to think again -- and hold onto stored books a little longer. [More]

Ebooks Driving Hardcovers into Collector Status Faster Than Previously Predicted

by Winnie Hsiu July 19, 2010 10:18 PM
It turns out that people really do love to read. Not only do people love to read, but they want to read what they want to read when they want to read it -- and that means that digital book, or ebooks, which can be downloaded instantly from the Internet, are taking off even faster than anyone could have predicted as recently as six months ago. Now Amazon.com has announced that Kindle books are selling much faster than ordinary hardcover bound books. (Kindle books are books that can be read by the Amazon Kindle ebook reader, the Amazon Kindle 2, Apple’s iPhone or iPad, Blackberry and Android devices, and PC and Macintosh computers.) The statistics do not include free ebooks offered by Amazon, of which there are more than a million.

Between the ebooks offered by Amazon and other booksellers, and the ebooks available through Google Books, the world of book publishing is about to go through a dramatic change. If you are currently choosing between getting rid of hardcover books that are in good condition, or putting them in a self storage unit, this may be the time to consider preserving those bound books -- a few years from now, they may indeed have become collectors’ items. Paperback books are still outselling ebooks, for the moment -- but the day is coming when paperbacks may be collectors’ items too. [More]

Collections in Storage May End Up Becoming Treasure Trove for Academics

by John Stevens December 28, 2009 9:36 AM
Some people may wonder why anyone would think it was worth it to keep a large collection of books (or stamps, doll houses, antique toys, or any other kind of collection) in self-storage. Collecting thousands of items related to one topic might seem like an endless, thankless task. But one reason to persist with a collecting hobby is that books, documents, antiques, and artwork may someday be in demand by academic institutions or museums. For example, today anyone looking for a repository of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia need look no farther than the University of Minnesota, thanks in large part to generous donations from private collectors.

The collection at the University of Minnesota began in 1974, when the university bought private collector James C. Iraldi's 160 volumes of Holmes first editions and periodicals featuring stories about Holmes. Then, in 1978, the widow of Mayo Clinic doctor Philip S. Hench, who was a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, donated his rather extensive Holmes collection. Later, Los Angeles lawyer Les Klinger, the author of The Annotated Sherlock Holmes series, who also provided guidance for Sherlock Holmes, the movie, donated his papers to the library. [More]
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